Tag Archives: Jane Reichhold

moment of grace (haibun)

the dreamer
never dreaming
to live a dream
leaving everyone else
behind in the future

long meadow
is too short to hold
the emptiness
of leaving a family
longing for their faces

high in the mountains
suspended over the valley
even spirits
smoothing the paths
toe to heel, toe to heel

ocean breezes
a coolness blowing inland
my message
meets hers mid-air
the tie that binds

© Jane Reichhold (taken from: She Alone)

Jane’s book “She Alone” describes a trip her daughter, Heidi, made into the Sierra Mountains. Between the stories Jane created tanka like the ones above.

Here is my haibun inspired by her masterpiece.

******************************

They decided to go on a hike up Owl’s Head . She knew her daughter was not an athletic type. But one thing they both had in common, appreciating the clean air of the forest. It would just be a bit more tiresome to savour it on the mountain…was it all worth it, she wondered, hearing her daughter grumble?

panting up the slope
soft breeze whistles
through the trees
awestruck suddenly
a doe freezes on their trail

tender moment
between mother and daughter
holding their gaze
speaking
would have been redundant

lightheaded
presence of Abenaki spirit
circling at the peak
brush of white feathers
snowy owl flaps its wings

©Tournesol’17/01/27

CDHK

new dawn (haiku)

Chèvrefeuille wrote this for inspiration at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai:
“Maybe you know that a lot of haiku poets wrote their Jisei and Werner shared Jane’s last haiku with me through the mail. This was Jane’s last haiku, her Jisei:

with the moon
night too disappears
into the ocean

© Jane Reichhold (1937-2016)

Share your memories and your haiku, tanka or other Japanese poetry form about Jane Reichhold with us all. Please remember Jane in your heart and let her spirit inspire you.

morning dew
evaporates at sunrise
a skylark’s song

© Chèvrefeuille

© Clr '15
© Clr ’15

as the sun dips
beneath the horizon,
dawns the other side

©Tournesol’16

In memory of Jane Reichhold – Aug. 7/16 (troibun)

© Clr '16
© Clr ’16

Walking home with her grandson after a wonderful day in the city,  she could not help but admire the sky. Once, her grandson was sound asleep, she read about the sad news…such a loss in the world of haiku. And then, she understood the mysteries of the sky tonight.

dash of white clouds
stand out
in the night sky

dash of white clouds
splash of goodness
wings of an angel

stand out
seventeen syllables
more or less

in the night sky
greets an angel with a smile
crescent moon

© Tournesol’16-08-07

And then she read this beautiful haiku  posted  by Chèvrefeuille at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, after she had written the above troiku.

without lights
the brightness of a blue sky
full of stars © Jane Reichhold

a star
stands outs tonight
for eternity

© Tournesol’16-08-07

shamanic journey
a red dragonfly comes
to guide the canoe © Jane Reichhold

new beginnings
only spirits see the path
still, unknown to us

© Tournesol’16-08-07

In memory of an artist, teacher and poet, Jane Reichhold.

http://chevrefeuillescarpediem.blogspot.ca/2016/08/carpe-diem-extra-august-6th-2016-first.html
Chèvrefeuille – Carpe Diem Haiku Kai

le prunier très cher/ the prized plum tree (haibun)

Credits: Japanese Plums

Retour sur la piste de Basho Encore” qui a écrit le haïku suivant peu après la mort soudaine de son ami, Yoshitada.

furu oto ya mimi mo su-naru ume no ame

un son tombant
aigrir mes oreilles
la pluie des prunes

© Basho (Clr traduit de la traduction anglaise par Jane Reichhold)

le prunier très cher

Mon beau-père est décédé mardi. Ce haïbun est écris dans le souvenir de monsieur Bernard. Le haïku de Matsuo Basho m’a rappelé de bon souvenirs de ce grand homme.

Je n’ai jamais vu un prunier avant celui qui était dans la cour de monsieur Bernard (grand-père de nos enfants) quand j’avais à peine seize ans et la fiancée de son fils. Je me souviens de l’arbre qui était grand et maigrichon ; nous avons ri et l’avons tous taquiné à combien d’années qu’il faudra pour enfin voir des fruits ;  mais nous avions tort. En quelques années, l’arbre a fleuri et a porté ses fruits.

Il était si fier de son prunier. Cela signifiait plus qu’un arbre pour lui. Ce fut sa première nouvelle maison dont qu’il et son épouse avaient réussi à gratter et économisez pour loger leurs trois enfants adolescents. Leur fils aîné avait déjà deux petits enfants. Maintenant, ils avaient la liberté d’une grande espace verte avec une petite clairière au fond de la cour. Ils avaient lutté pendant de nombreuses années et maintenant ils avaient humble jardin, quelques arbres et une maison pour appeler «le leur».  C’était une grande victoire.

douce éclat
whoosh sur les brins d’
herbe
première goutte de prune

© Tournesol ‘15

 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

“Back on the trail of Basho Encore” who wrote the following haiku shortly after the sudden death of his friend, Yoshitada.

furu oto ya mimi mo su-naru ume no ame
a falling sound

that sours my ears
plum rain © Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

 the prized plum tree

My father-in-law and the grandfather of our children, died on Tuesday. This haibun is in memory of monsieur Bernard. Basho’s haiku reminded me of this great man.

The first plum tree I ever saw was in his back yard when I was barely sixteen, engaged to his son. I remember how tall and scrawny the tree looked and we all chuckled and teased him at how many years it would take to see any fruit but we were wrong. In just a few years, the tree blossomed and bore fruit.

He was so proud of his plum tree. It meant more than a tree to him. This was his first new house his wife and he had managed to scrape and save to own and house their three adolescent children. Their eldest son had already two small children. Now they had the freedom of a huge backyard with a wooded area beyond the property. They had struggled for many years so a humble garden, a few trees and a home to call “theirs” was a huge victory.

soft thump
swish on blades of grass
first plum drop

© Tournesol ’15

Carpe Diem, on the trial with Basho Encore

 

briny beads (tan renga)

http://www.educationquizzes.com/library/Gardening/Ferns_and_Grasses/Ostrich-fern-C.jpg

When I saw this prompt and Jane Reichhold’s haiku referring to the shape of “wild rivers” and “ferns” I could not help but be right at my special spot by the river rapids and so I decided to add my thoughts in a Tan Renga. I hope that’s okay.

wild rivers
the joy unfurls
in ferns © Jane Reichhold

grief spills briny beads
white-water sweetens   © Tournesol ’15